Get to Know Guest Pianist Wei Luo

Wei Luo
Wei Luo

Pianist Wei Luo performs Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto with the Kansas City Symphony on Feb. 17-19 in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. The program also includes Hindemith’s jazzy Ragtime, up-and-coming composer David Hertzberg’s for none shall gaze upon the Father and live as well as Beethoven’s jubilant Eighth Symphony. Tickets start at $25. To secure your seats, call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or select seats online here.

Tell us about yourself. When did you start playing the piano and when did you know you want to pursue piano performance as a career?

I am a girl from China who just turned 18, and I have played the piano for about 13 years. I started playing piano when I was 5, and not kidding, I wanted to be professional pianist when I first started. Now, I am honored to study with Mr. Graffman and Mr. McDonald at Curtis, and I am also a high school senior.

What can audiences expect to hear when you perform Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto? Do you have a favorite moment or moments? If so, which ones and why?

I basically love the entire concerto, but my favorite part would be the lyrical passages. They are very special among the brilliant and sparkling passages. I would like to audiences to hear the dissonance in the harmonies with the poetic lines, and the excited rhythms and brilliant passages — especially in the fast movements. The contrasts of characters in the music (introverted and extroverted) are very interesting as well.

If you had to pick, who is your favorite composer and why?

Beethoven. The great depths, passions and reasons in his pieces are so challenging. They always require my complete devotion to study and think about how they work together. And there are so many “nutrients” that I get from his works when I delve into them. The more you think about it, the more you get from his music.

This will be your debut with the Kansas City Symphony. Are you excited to perform in Helzberg Hall?

Yes! I am extremely looking forward to playing in the wonderful hall, and the most important of all, it’s like a dream come true for me to work with Maestro Michael Stern! I am so honored and grateful for this wonderful opportunity.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

Hmm, when I was 10 years old at Shanghai Conservatory Middle School, during my piano final test, I forgot to pull up my dress’ zipper on the right side (facing the audience)… The judges laughed, and I felt beyond embarrassed … but fortunately, it didn’t affect my grade and I still got 1st!

When you’re not making music or preparing for a concert, what do you like to do in your free time?

I like to stay at home resting, working out, watching shows and baking cakes and pies! Going to museums and concerts are fun too.

Is there anything in particular you want to do or see outside of the concert hall when you’re visiting Kansas City?

I’ve heard that the museums in Kansas City are great, and I should go visit after concerts.

What other upcoming concerts are you looking forward to in the near future?

Among my coming recitals, I very much look forward to giving a solo recital in San Francisco at the Herbst Theatre in early April. In May and July, I’ll play in the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, where I am extremely honored to play with violinist Daniel Hope and clarinetist Todd Levy.

Anything else you’d like to add?

Again, thanks so much for your support, and I will always treasure my experiences in Kansas City! Hope you enjoy the wonderful piece by Prokofiev.


Feb. 17-19To secure tickets to hear Wei Luo perform this weekend (Feb. 17-19) with the Kansas City Symphony, call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or select seats here.

Get to Know Guest Pianist George Li

George LiGeorge Li performs as soloist alongside the Kansas City Symphony in Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 (Jan. 20-22). To secure tickets, contact the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or visit kcsymphony.org. Also on the program, led by guest conductor Ludovic Morlot, is Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, “Pastoral.”

Tell us about yourself. When did you start playing the piano? When did you know you wanted to be a professional musician?

I have lived all my life in Massachusetts, so I guess I’m a Boston boy through and through! My parents originated from China, so I was raised in a hybrid of sorts from American and Chinese culture. I started playing the piano when I was 4 and a half, and my passion for music was ignited before that, partly because I was exposed to classical music a lot. Neither of my parents play an instrument, but I had grown used to my sister practicing the piano, and in addition, my mom would take us to concerts in Boston, and turn on the classical music radio station before going to bed.

I started wanting to become a professional musician after I played a concert with orchestra, performing Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto. Somehow, I felt differently playing on stage that day, as if I had entered a different world. After the performance, many people came up to me to say how affected they were by my playing. I had no idea music could be so powerful, and from then on, I wanted to continue making music for people.  

You’ll be performing Chopin’s First Piano Concerto with the Kansas City Symphony. What do you love about the work?

The piece is indeed very dear to me, as I’m sure it is for everyone else as well! There is of course the element of the many beautiful arching and singing melodies, but for me, I love the piece especially because of its depth. It shows that Chopin is much more than a composer who creates beautifully sweet and soothing melodies; granted, he does this with ease, but there is also the passionate, stormy and tragic side to him. There is so much nuance and finesse to his music, and hopefully I’ll be able to show that this weekend!

Beyond Chopin, who are your other favorite composers and why?

This is a tough question for me, because I try to form a solid relationship with every composer that I play and every piece that I’m working on. Very often, I learn to love the piece and the composer that I play, but I feel a stronger bond with composers like Beethoven, Schumann and Rachmaninoff — all geniuses in their own right.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I love to read, and am a sports fanatic! The first sport I felt passionate about was — and still is — baseball, and now my interest in sports has grown to soccer, football and basketball as well. I only play soccer nowadays, and just in small groups to avoid any injuries.

What are other highlights of your 2016-17 season?

I played with Maestro Dudamel and the LA Philharmonic at the opening gala, and also made my orchestral debut in the Berlin Philharmonie, both of which were really exciting. Coming up, I will make my debuts with the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Hamburg Philharmonic Orchestra.

Where are you headed next after Kansas City?

I will go to Barcelona next to play Liszt Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Mariinsky Orchestra and Maestro Gergiev.


George Li
George Li

To hear George Li perform Chopin’s First Piano Concerto with the Kansas City Symphony on the Jan. 20-22 concerts, select seats online or call the Symphony Box Office between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays at (816) 471-0400.

Get to Know Guest Pianist Robert Levin

Pianist Robert Levin. Photo credit: Clive Barda
Pianist Robert Levin. Photo credit: Clive Barda

The Kansas City Symphony presents “Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn” featuring guest pianist Robert Levin and led by guest conductor Bernard Labadie on Nov. 25-27 in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Levin performs Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto, and the program also includes two Mozart overtures from Don Giovanni and La clemenza di Tito, as well as Haydn’s Symphony No. 98. Tickets from $25. Call the Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or select your seat here.

Tell us about Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto, which you’re performing with the Kansas City Symphony for the Nov. 18-20 concerts.
It is deeply influenced by Mozart’s Concerto No. 24 (K.491), which is in the same key and had a profound influence on Beethoven. An oft-cited anecdote has him strolling through the Augarten, a public park in Vienna, with his friend the composer and later music publisher and merchant Johann Baptist Cramer. A performance of the Mozart concerto was taking place in the park. At a certain passage Beethoven grabbed his friend by the arm and cried out, “Cramer! Cramer! We shall NEVER be able to do anything like this!” Indeed, Mozart’s fondness for the key of C minor was taken over by Beethoven in such works as the Pathétique piano sonata, the sonatas Op. 10/1 and 111, the violin sonata Op. 30/2, the string quartet Op. 18/4 and the Fifth Symphony. In turn Beethoven’s Third Concerto influenced Rachmaninoff, who took over some of its characteristics (the key of C minor, the use of an exotic key, E major, for the middle movement, and a fugal passage in the finale). The first movement combines bravura and fire; the second is a profound spiritual experience, and the last movement a gypsy romp.

Do you have a favorite movement? If so, which one and why?
I don’t, because each is so intensely and irresistibly different, but the finale is particularly fun to play.

You’re known for your ability to improvise in the style of great composers, such as Mozart and Beethoven. Will you have the opportunity to improvise in these performances — will you play your own cadenzas?
Yes, I shall be improvising a total of five cadenzas — the long one in the first movement, and slower ones in the second movement (1) and the finale (3). These will stay within Beethoven’s language and are high-wire acts, because I do not prepare: they are absolutely off the cuff.

Tell us about guest conductor Bernard Labadie. How often have you two had the opportunity to collaborate?
Numerous times, in Canada and the U. S. I have enormous respect for Maestro Labadie. His recording of my completion to the Mozart Requiem, made immediately after 9/11, is one of the best. Collaborating with him is a great pleasure.

The programs also feature Mozart overtures from Don Giovanni and La clemenza di Tito. As a Mozart scholar, is there any other background or context that might fascinate or intrigue audiences about either of these two works?
Both were “rush jobs” at the last minute: Mozart wrote down the overture to Don Giovanni in the wee hours the night before the premiere: Constanze had to keep plying him with coffee and tell him stories to keep him awake. One can see this in the autograph: the notation of the first violin and bass lines is clear and careful, the other string voices a bit more hurried, the winds a bit more so and the brass and timpani are written at breakneck speed, with the note stems, which should be vertical, all drawn toward the right in a desperate attempt to get the overture on paper so the copyist could prepare the orchestral parts on time. In the case of La clemenza di tito the entire opera was composed in something like three weeks; Mozart did not have enough time to write the recitatives himself and his assistant, Franz Xaver Süssmayr (who later had the unenviable task of trying to finish the Requiem so that Mozart’s widow could receive the second half of the commission fee, which she needed urgently to feed her two sons) had to take that job over.

These concerts follow the Thanksgiving holiday, which is centered around food and family. We contend attending live music also makes for a lovely holiday tradition. What are you thankful for this year?
I am perpetually thankful that God brought my beloved wife, the piano virtuoso Ya-Fei Chuang, into my life.

What advice do you give to aspiring music students?
A piece of music tells a story. If you don’t tell a story that grabs the audience, no-one will listen. Be brave, take risks, build suspense, joy, terror, ecstasy. Keep people up at night thinking about how your performance changed their understanding of life. Do for music what Meryl Streep does for acting.

After Kansas City, where do you go next? What are other upcoming highlights for you this season?
To Juilliard, for one of my guest stints there; then to Burgundy to perform and record the Schubert piano trios with Noah Bendix-Balgley (concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic) and Peter Wiley (formerly of the Beaux-Arts Trio). In February I record nine of the Mozart sonatas on his piano for ECM (the other nine will be done in 2018). In March I tour for the second time with violinist Hilary Hahn. Later in the spring I solo with and conduct the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra.

When you’re not making music, what other pastimes do you enjoy?
I’m a streetcar/light rail enthusiast.

Anything else you’d like to add?
I can’t wait to get back to Arthur Bryant’s for a burnt ends sandwich.

Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn
Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn

 

Secure your seats to “Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn” by calling the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or selecting seats online here. Tickets start at $25.

 

Get to Know Guest Conductor/Pianist Jeffrey Kahane

Jeffrey Kahane
Jeffrey Kahane

Editor’s note: Maestro Jeffrey Kahane conducts the Kansas City Symphony for the June 3-5 Classical Series concerts and is the featured soloist for Ravel’s jazzy Piano Concerto in G Major. To secure your seats, call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or select seats online. 

Welcome back to Kansas City! Is there anything you hope to do during your visit that you didn’t get a chance to do last time? 

Well, the only problem with a program like this, where I am playing a difficult concerto as well as conducting the entire program, is that I don’t have any time to do anything much other than practice, rehearse, eat and sleep! I’d love to do some sight-seeing in KC, but I’m afraid that will have to wait for another visit.

What are you most looking forward in these upcoming Kansas City Symphony concerts?

Pretty much everything. I had such a great time with the orchestra last time playing Mozart and conducting Rachmaninoff, and this time it will be a joy to play one of my absolute favorite works, the G major Ravel Concerto, as well as conducting the delightful Symphony No. 88 of Haydn. I suppose I could say that it will be an extra-special treat to conduct to magnificent works which are all-too-little know to concert-goers, Dvořák’s thrilling late tone-poems “The Water Goblin” and “The Noon Witch.” These are pieces written at the end of Dvořák’s life, after he had returned from American to his homeland and after he had composed his most famous work, the so-called  “New World” Symphony. They show the composer at the peak of his imaginative powers, displaying his gift both for glorious melodies and ravishing orchestral colors, with the added element of gripping musical story-telling

Tell us about yourself; where did you study piano and conducting, and how long did it take you to master doing both at the same time?

I studied piano in Los Angeles where I grew up, as well as at the San Francisco Conservatory, at Juilliard, and in London. I never studied conducting formally, though I had wonderful guidance from a number of distinguished conductors and had the great education of observing great conductors in rehearsal from the time I was very young.

Conducting and playing at the same time is something that actually came fairly naturally to me, it was not something that took a long time to learn, but I suppose I have refined my approach to it quite a bit having done it now for more than 25 years.

What considerations must a musician account for while conducting and playing the piano simultaneously as opposed to individually?

One has to be able to concentrate on exactly the right thing at the right time. In other words, one has to know when the orchestra really needs a cue or some kind of particular guidance, and when they can simply rely on themselves.

Do you have a favorite part (or parts) in the Ravel piece? If so, which part(s) and why?

The opening of the slow movement of the concerto is one of the most moving and beautiful things in all of music. I have played it easily a hundred times in performance, and I never tire of it. It is also particularly moving when that great melody comes back and is played by the English horn — most players of that instrument will agree it is one of the half-dozen greatest solos for the instrument ever written, and I also relish that moment because I simply listen to and accompany the English horn there.

Why did you select Haydn’s Symphony No. 88 and the Dvořák works, The Water Goblin and The Noonday Witch, to also be on the concert program? Generally speaking, how do you like to approach programming for a Symphony concert? 

I don’t have a single approach to programming, it varies constantly. Sometimes I’ll program with a them in mind, and others, like the program I’m conducting this coming weekend with the Kansas City Symphony, I simply put together with the idea of balance and variety. These are just four works I love and I think make for a wonderfully varied and interesting evening.

What’s next on your performance agenda? 

I’ll be conducting and playing with the Milwaukee Symphony, in a program that also includes the Ravel Concerto, but also includes Copland’s Appalachian Spring, Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from “West Side Story,” and the original jazz band version of Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the audience? 

I think this is going to be a special week for me, and I hope it is for my colleagues and the audience as well!


The Kansas City Symphony performs “Spring Fling: Ravel and Dvořák” June 3-5 in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Kansas City, Mo. On the program is Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G Major, Haydn’s Symphony No. 88 and The Water Goblin and The Noonday Witch by Dvorak. Tickets start at $25. To purchase, call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 or select seats online.

Get to Know Guest Pianist Benjamin Grosvenor

Benjamin Grosvenor - operaomnia.co.uk
Benjamin Grosvenor – operaomnia.co.uk

Editor’s note: Guest pianist Benjamin Grosvenor performs Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27 with the Kansas City Symphony for the April 1-3 concerts in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Mahler’s First Symphony is also on the program. Tickets start at $25. Select your seat online here or call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400.

What are you most looking forward to in your upcoming performances with the Kansas City Symphony?

I’m looking forward to playing the Mozart concerto with your wonderful orchestra. It’s a glorious piece, beautifully lyrical and full of elegance and charm.

Do you have a favorite part or moment in the Mozart piece?

The slow movement is incredibly serene and beautiful, but there is a particularly touching and intimate moment where the violins and wind join the piano for a restatement of the opening theme.

Will this be your first time playing in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts? Is this your first time in Kansas City?

This will be my first time at Helzberg Hall, but not in Kansas City, as I gave a recital with the Friends of Chamber Music in April 2014. However I wasn’t there for very long then, so I hope to walk and explore the city a little more this time.

What’s up next for you? Where do you travel to after Kansas City?

Immediately after I am going to Washington D.C. to play the same piece there, and I’m playing it also in Naples, Florida before going back to England.


cs10_4-1_zpse6a52414 To secure your tickets to hear guest pianist Benjamin Grosvenor perform Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27 with the Kansas City Symphony for the April 1-3 concerts in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, visit the ticket page here or call the Symphony Box Office at (816) 471-0400 between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Tickets start at $25. Mahler’s First Symphony is also on the program.

 

 

Get to Know Christmas Festival Guest Pianist Rich Ridenour

Special guest and featured pianist Rich Ridenour performs with the Kansas City Symphony for the Christmas Festival concerts on Dec. 17-20 and Dec. 22. Ticket information here.

Pianist Rich Ridenour, Photo by Bassel Jadaa

Tell us about yourself. When did you start playing the piano?

When I was 8. I was forced into it by Mother. Geez. I was not a model student at first. But when I discovered girls were impressed I played piano, I started to practice more.

What are you most looking forward to in your upcoming performances with the Kansas City Symphony?

Connecting again with the wonderful audience and orchestra. I had a great time playing as Jennifer Holiday’s warm-up act two years ago. The Kansas City Symphony rocks.

Do you have a favorite piece that is part of the upcoming concerts? If so, which one and why?

Not fair. This is like selecting a favorite child. The variety of moods will be special. I do relate to Charlie Brown Christmas in many ways. Some days I am Charlie Brown.

Since you’ll be in Kansas City for several days, is there anything in particular that you plan to do?

Shop. Will Worlds of Fun be open? Definitely the Boulevard Brewing Company (after show).

The Christmas Festival concerts are a big hit with families and children. Do you have any advice for young musicians?

Find the joy in music and play music you relate to. I did not find any joy in music at first (as I mentioned earlier…), so some students need to give some time to try it on. Whether you are on stage or in your home music is a huge lift to the soul.

Do you have any favorite holiday traditions you observe?

I ring bells for Rotary. I still hear ringing from last year.

What’s up next for you? Where do you travel to after Kansas City?

After Kansas City, I travel back to Sarasota to pick up my wife and within 24 hours we will be in cold Michigan with my family. Then, I play with the Greensboro Symphony for New Year’s Eve with my son Brandon who played trumpet with Canadian brass for seven years.

Concert Tickets:

To hear guest pianist Rich Ridenour perform with the Kansas City Symphony, Symphony Chorus, Allegro Choirs of Kansas City and Rezound! Handbell Ensemble for the Christmas Festival concerts, please call (816) 471-0400 or select your seat online. Tickets start at $30 for adults and $15 for children.

Kansas City Symphony's Christmas Festival

Get to Know Guest Pianist Alessio Bax

Alessio Bax performs with the Kansas City Symphony Nov. 27-29

Editor’s Note: Guest pianist Alessio Bax  appears as soloist with the Kansas City Symphony on Nov. 27-29 to perform Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain. Visit the concert listing page for more information on programming and tickets.

Tell us about yourself. When did you start playing the piano?

I was 7 years old when my parents bought me a little electric toy keyboard as a gift. That’s how it all started.

What are you most looking forward to in your upcoming performances with the Kansas City Symphony?

I have played a recital for the Harriman-Jewell series in Kansas City a few years ago and have such great memories of it and of Kansas City audiences. I have known of the orchestra and its great reputation for a while now, and of course of the stunning Helzberg Hall. It’s all very exciting.

Will this be your first time playing in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts?

Yes!

Do you have a favorite part or moment in the Falla work? If so, which part (or parts) and why?

So many. It is a very special and unique work. It is full of Spanish and Andalusian sounds, and I dare say flavors and fragrances as well. It’s powerfully evocative and emotionally charged but always restrained at the same time. It’s thrilling to play. Its emotional range is so vast. From sweet and intimate to forceful rhythms to eerie melodies: it has it all!

Since you’ll be in Kansas City for several days, is there anything in particular you plan to do beyond prepping and performing at the concerts?

Food is my other passion. I love to cook but also to explore local restaurants, markets etc. On my last visit to Kansas City I met food writer and photographer Bonjwing Lee (Ulterior Epicure) and we became good friends. He has re-centered his life around food, so we quickly connected. Luckily he will be in town that week and hopefully we will hit a few spots together!

Do you have any advice for aspiring musicians?

Go to live performance as much as possible, and play for your friends every time you have a chance. Also, do lots of chamber music. You can really learn invaluable lessons from these three things.

What’s up next for you? Where do you travel to after Kansas City?

It’s been a pretty crazy recently with two separate trips to South America, and performances in the States, from solo recitals to different concerti and chamber music performances, in between. After Kansas City, I will take my last trip of the year. It’s an Asian tour with the wonderful concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Daishin Kashimoto.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the audience?

I am very excited to come back to Kansas City and meet a wonderful new orchestra in your gorgeous hall. I am especially proud to bring to you a favorite work of mine, Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain, as this is quite rare to see in programs nowadays. I am also extremely happy to reunite with Maestro Carlos Miguel Prieto, after few years. Hope to see you there!


Concert Tickets:
To hear guest pianist Alessio Bax perform Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain with the Kansas City Symphony under the baton of guest conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto, call (816) 471-0400 or select your seat online. Tickets start at $25.

Get to Know Guest Pianist Yevgeny Sudbin

Yevgeny Sudbin, pianist
Yevgeny Sudbin, pianist. Photo credit: Mark Harrison.

Editor’s note: Guest pianist Yevgeny Sudbin performs the Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 2 with the Kansas City Symphony on the March 27-29, 2015 concerts. Visit the concert listing page for more information on programming and tickets.

1. Tell us about yourself. When did you start playing piano? When did you decide to pursue music as your career?

I grew up listening to my parents practicing the piano at home. They both met at the Music Conservatory in St. Petersburg. When I was 4, I began listening to classical LPs that we had at home and trying to play the music that I heard by ear. When I was 5, I started having lessons with my mother and later was accepted into a specialist music school in St. Petersburg, which was very hard to get into. When I was 7, I won the first international piano competition in the Czech Republic. I never really made a conscious decision to make playing the piano my career; it just happened and the piano was always part of my life and concerts happened as a happy side effect.

2. Will this be your first time to play in Helzberg Hall at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts? Are you looking forward to working with the Kansas City Symphony and guest conductor Carlos Kalmar?

Yes, this will be my first time. I previously performed solo recitals at the Folly Theatre. I am very much looking forward to it.

3. What do you love about Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto? How does it speak to you as an artist? Why do you think Beethoven’s music seems to stand the test of time — what is it about his music that appeals to audiences?

All five Beethoven concertos are extremely satisfying to play. All are different and have their own strengths. No. 2 in particular was in fact written before No. 1 (although the cadenza was written many years later by Beethoven) and people often compare it with a Mozart concerto, which I think can be misleading. I find the music more romantic than his later concertos (which in my opinion are more classical, paradoxically). It has operatic elements in the 2nd movement where you can almost hear the piano sing with a human voice. The last movement has a lot of humour, frequently interrupted by typically Beethovenian outbursts of madness or bad temper (in the middle section). The fugue-like cadenza in the first movement is completely crazy; one can hardly believe it was written by Beethoven; it sounds very modern for his time!

I think Beethoven appeals to audiences because the human elements — whether it’s joyous exultation, bad-tempered manners, angst or comedy — are always vividly present in his music. But it is not possible to compress the composer’s genius in just a sentence or two.

Yevgeny Sudbin at the piano
Yevgeny Sudbin at the piano. Photo credit: Clive Barda

4. While you’re here, you’ll give a piano master class on Saturday, March 28. What advice do you give aspiring musicians?

Perhaps the most important thing at the beginning is finding a suitable mentor or teacher and later, discovering your own strengths, and acknowledge weaknesses. Discovering and developing your own musical personality becomes key. One has to also rationalise whether a performing career is suitable in the first place. As with most top professions where perfection is not enough to guarantee success, the sacrifices one might have to be prepared to make at times will not be small.


 

Sudbin makes his debut with the Kansas City Symphony perfoming Beethoven’s Piano Concert No. 2 on the March 27-29 concerts. The concert program also includes Dvořák’s Seventh Symphony and Tchaikovsky’s Capriccio italien. Tickets start at $25. Reserve your seat online or contact the Symphony Box Office between 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. weekdays at (816) 471-0400.